About your Search

20130211
20130219
STATION
MSNBC 7
MSNBCW 7
CSPAN 4
CSPAN2 4
FBC 2
KPIX (CBS) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 31
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
'll defer that judgment to history. as to the comment i made about the most dangerous foreign policy decision since vietnam was about not just the surge, but the overall war of choice going into iraq. >> ah. not just about the surge, it was about the overall war of choice going into iraq. right. so is john mccain trying to relitigate that? the overall war of choice going into iraq? is he trying to relitigate that the decision to go into iraq was a disaster? yes, actually, yes. that is what this is all about, an effort to rehabilitate the iraq war in the american mind, to make it seem like it was success, or at least that it wasn't a bad idea, or at least that it wasn't the biggest foreign policy disaster since vietnam, or at least that it wasn't a scandal that ought to scar everybody associated with it in american politics for the rest of their careers. and because being wrong about the iraq war was not just an individual scandal, but a big scandal, this ends up being a big project, this revisionist history, until we come clean about this. until we get honest about it. until we can d
of the last decade. at the moment, few americans spontaneously mentioned foreign policy, or specifically the wars in afghanistan, conflicts in the middle east, or even things like nuclear weapons in korea. anything having to do with foreign policy or overseas activity is not top of mind for the average american at this point. we just measured obama on approval rating. his number one issue was national defence. it is a strength for this president. he is perceived as doing well on that part of his portfolio. but it is not a party for americans. host: very interesting information. the c-span audience is getting a first look at it with you. thank you for giving us a preview on america's most important problems, as we look at the state of the union address. thanks so much. we are going to go back to our phone calls, asking you the same question. what is taught on your mind, in problems facing the country? aha caller: -- ♪ caller: a relief of the president stresses the importance of both sides putting aside their own political interests in the sake of moving the country forward. there are wa
, had choice words for the president's foreign policy team. i'm not sure i agree with that. in "the new york times," a great must-read, quietly killing a consumer watchdog. it's how the republicans are just doing everything they can not to have the consumer financial protection bureau that was created by elizabeth warren under president obama actually function because it would keep them, quite frankly, from being able to get their money from all their donors on wall street. and they do not want to lose the people who helped them out. so they want to make sure that the consumer suffers so that they can gain politically. it's a good one. take a look at it. coming up -- >> we're also going to talk about nancy pelosi saying we don't have a spending problem, and the problem with medicare is not medicare. we've got a lot to talk about straight ahead. >> gail collins of "the new york times" joins us straight ahead. >> she's got a great column. >> i love it. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely,
, manufacturing, immigration. he talked about foreign policy issues as well. here's the new york times with a little history about the state of the union addresses. ronald in kentucky, independent. what are your thoughts on the state of the union? caller: i liked what he set about raising the minimum wage and immigration reform and some of the others things. i am a little frustrated with congress and why they cannot get their act together and work together to get things done. host: what would you like to see them get done? caller: i would like to see them get things done, not taking so long to get the budget under control. instead of all this talk about cutting benefits, cutting things there. i never heard nobody mentioned nothing about so much money the u.s. is sending overseas to these other countries. out others, helping doing my part. but before you start cutting people that have worked all their lives to support the united states, start looking overseas and seeing where you are sending the money. host: budget experts have said the foreign aid makes up less than -- it's not even do
of foreign policy, and if you look at the fact that he has ended in the war in iraq, he has meandering towards ending the war in afghanistan, he's allowing the pentagon, and you've got to remember when you look at the pentagon, you're looking at an institution that has the fine motor skills of a dinosaur. it takes the pentagon a long time to put together a timetable such as for withdraw. all obama has to do, and i know it's not this simple, but i would look at the experience, came in in 1995, gave the speech in 1996, announcing the bleeding wound, he had nazis tell schulz we were getting out and the military had a year to turn it around, and they wouldn't be able to. 88, they announced the timetable, 89 they were gone. we need to do something similar. military's had its chances. we had 11 commanders in afghanistan in 11 years. look at thomas rick's book "the generals" that devotes a lot of attention to this. that's not a war where we can be successful. it's not the kind of military we have. there's no military that's ever been successful in a counter insurgency, and not only do they ha
the president's foreign policy priorities ought to be, looking at response to the turmoil of the arab spring, dealing with russia wouldn't seem to be anyone's natural first priority right now. jenna: one of the arguments, though, for doing this, according to "the new york times," is it would save a lot of money. if we don't have to keep these nuclear weapons and store them and watch them, that's going to save us a lot of cash, and we know the type of financial situation we're in right now. why isn't that a good argument? >> one, everyone would like to save cash, but really we've had $5 trillion added to our national debt over recent years, and maintenance of our nuclear strategic capability contributed nothing to that. and the proposed cuts, they say, would reduce about $120 billion in spending over 20 years, which is really a drop in the wasn't compared -- bucket compared to approaching $20 trillion in national debt. the second is the cut into intellectual capabilities well that should be stimulating economic development, research and development and applied technology. hitting these areas,
. obama's foreign policy. >> let's get this done. send me a comprehensive immigration reform bill in the next few months and i will sign it right away and america will be better for it. >> reporter: many lawmakers wore green ribbons in solidarity with newtown, connecticut, and victims of gun violence occupied seats of honor. in his emotionally charged close, mr. obama asked congress to ask congress what it hasn't done in two decades, hold real vote on gun control. >> if you want to vote no that's your choice but these proposals deserve a vote. >> reporter: with first lady michelle obama, the parents of 15-year-old hadiya pendleton, gunned down in chicago only weeks after marching in inauguration festivities in washington. >> hadiya's parents, nate and cleo, are in this chamber tonight along with more than two dozen americans whose lives have been torn apart by gun violence. they deserve a vote. >> reporter: but calling for a vote is not the same thing as asking congress to pass a new law. mr. obama did that with immigration reform but not gun control, concedin
of president obama's foreign policy. >> let's get this done. send me the bill in the next couple of months and i'll sign it right away. >> reporter: many lawmakers wore green ribbons in solidarity of the newtown, connecticut. in his close president obama asked congress do what they haven't done in nearly two decades. >> if you want to vote no, that's your choice, but these propoetals deserve a vote. >> reporter: with michelle obama the parents of hadiya pendleton, gunned down after she performed at president obama's inauguration. >> hadiya's parents are here along with americanses who families were torn down by gun violence, they deserve a vote. >> reporter: but asking for a vote is not the same thing as encouraging congress to pass a new law. the president did that on immigration control. charlie and norah? >> major garrett, thanks. senator, good morning. >> good morning. >> deserves a vote. >> first of all, our heart is broken for those people. all of us would want to prevent that from happening. the problem is everything the president is proposed would do nothing to prevent it from happ
foreign policy tonight. you will hear about the president trying to, um, pull troops out of afghanistan. you can bet we'll hear that. and, of course, we'll probably hear about north korea since that happened today. i heard you mention that earlier. so that might change things a little bit. but i think there will be a good number of things that he will not mention, which is interesting. >> guest: for the record, i've never observed a pattern of wars beginning in conjunction with state of the union addresses. [laughter] but one thing i'm going to be watching for is the congressional black caucus met recently with valerie jarrett on the hill, and she's one of the president's top advisers. they discussed the state of the union to some extent, and the question i have is whether he's going to address black unemployment specifically and things that will help bring that number down. i think that that's what the congressional black caucus wants, but i don't know if that's what he's going to do. >> host: we're talking with anita kumar and jonathan strong, iowa anita works for mcclatchy newspapers
was dismissive, on climate change, which was dismissive. i think there were two sentences on foreign policy. i think you have to say more about the position of the united states and the world. >> the middle east is in flames right now. you should probably talk about it. >> you have to be self-aware. and i think of chris christie, who i believe, unless i remember incorrectly, turned it down. >> he's a smart man, chris christie, and he's in the 70s. >> he turned this one down? >> not this one. >> i have a question that perhaps john heilemann can answer. marco rubio's a smart guy, an attractive guy, an articulate guy with a terrific life story. why is it that in an age in the past few months when the republicans have been talking about broadening the base of the party, speaking to a larger audience, why is it that he spent so much time last night seemingly preaching to the choir rather than talking to the country? >> that's a good point. >> well, you know, mike, i think he points out the awkward intraparty politics that the republicans now face. you know, you have a party that does need to broade
effective approach to foreign policy. so i am enormously proud of what we have achieved and i'm confident about the future having left the state department in capable hands of secretary john kerry, himself an accomplished diplomat decorated navy veteran. so i believe we have established a strong base for this kind of collaboration, which i think is essential and going forward against the challenges and threats that we face. i have been of growing up in a navy household. during world war ii, my father is a chief petty up sir, training soldiers before they were picked up to the pacific. he sits on my brothers and me how i felt watching this young man get loaded knowing that many would never return home. after he died, many years later, i received an outpouring of letters and photographs are men he trained, who is served and returned home in the lives and families of their own. i just couldn't believe that experience, being yelled at them i thought there so four-minute for a time when i was glad to hear it, frankly. i saw this same sense of dedication and duty when i first lady and senator f
" focusing on foreign policies issues ahead on capitol hill. host: and now on your screen is representative elliot engel, democrat of new york and in the 113th congress the ranking member, the top democrat on the foreign affairs committee. representative engel, as always, we appreciate you being on the "washington journal." from that perch in the foreign affairs committee, what's your -- what are some of your issues this year that you'd like to confront? guest: well, obviously the president spoke at the state of the union the other night, talked about winding down the war in afghanistan finally and removing american troops. when the troops are actually all removed, still negotiations between us and the afghanis about what american presence will be afterwards. but that's, i think, something that the american people are tired of and happy to see winding down. we also, of course, have the volatile middle east, where we have the arab spring and egypt and syria, of course, in the throes of a civil war. assad brutally killing his own people. clearly he's going to go. the question is who comes in
in iraq, the decision to help prevent our losing that war when he said was the most dangerous foreign policy blunder since vietnam. it's quite obvious now that that statement was his tree i don't know nick, woe -- was histrionic, woefully uninformed and absurd. i didn't raise it at senator hagel's hearing for an i told you so moment but to determine he if senator hagel recognizes he was in error. and more importantly, if that recognition informs his judgment today. i wanted to know if he had learned from his mistakes. unfortunately, i'm not confident that he has. after two weeks of reviewing his record, my concerns about whether senator hagel is ready to serve as secretary of defense have not diminished. nothing in senator hagel's background indicates that he would effectively manage the department of defense. in today's unprecedented environment of fiscal uncertainty, ensuring that defense investment decisions affecting an agency as massive and unwieldy as the department of defense do not adversely impact our military readiness is enormously challenging. it requires that the secretar
. we must effectively deal with the rise of violence in our country. on foreign policy, america continues to be first in property and safe guarding human rights. the world is a better place when america is the strongest nation on earth. we can't remain powerful if we don't have a economy that can afford it. in the short time i've been in washington, nothing has been more difficult than the choices. the choice is not just between big government or business. what we need is accountable and efficient and effective government that allows small and new businesses to create more middle class jobs. we don't have to raise taxes to avoid the president's devastating cuts to our military. republicans passed a plan that replaced these cuts with responsible spending reforms. in order to balance our budget the choice doesn't have to be higher taxes or dramatic benefit cuts for those in need, instead we should grow our economy so we can create new taxpayers, not new taxes. so our government can afford to help others who truly cannot help themselves. and the truth is every problem can't be solv
system in our country and deal with the millions here. are we putting foreigners to the front of the line? will they get these great jobs that americans won't? >> it's absolutely a challenge. i certainly think that the review of our immigration policy is important. we have an immigration system that is dysfunctional. people who try to come here legally get trapped in a system that never gives him an answer. the legislation that i and my colleagues have introduced, start up 3.0 deals with a segment of that. one is a stimac issue that has received a lot of attention. they have an idea to have a dream, they want americans to work. and they are told that they can't do that here in the united states because they can't get the status to stay here. neil: i understand. but how would you address things. we certainly don't want these guys coming here, what you say? >> the visas included our visas that will help me demand work for employees in the united states. we need to spend more time and effort and energy and resources on making certain that americans pursue degrees, advanced degrees in mathema
third nuclear test overnight. the therapy of the house foreign affairs committee just weighed in. he says the obama administration must replace its failed north korean policy with one that is energetic, creative and focused on crippling the kim regime's military capabilities through stringent sanctions. senior foreign affairs correspondent greg palkot has the late nest london. you moved from the pope's story to this world crisis now, greg. >> yeah, crazy week. the world, in fact, got a bit more dangerous overnight. u.n. officials, i was speaking to a few minutes ago, confirmed to me that they believe the north korea has tested yet another nuclear device. but most importantly, they tell me this device is twice as powerful as the one they detonated in 2009. they base that on seismic measurements they're taking from the test site. north korea today claiming they have tested a smaller, more sophisticated device, which means, according to my contacts in north korea and korea that i've been speaking to, this could be better put on top of a missile. remember, in december, north korea had th
policy that confronts climate change and reduces our reliance on foreign oil. we need that urgency to formulate a transportation plan so that states can address their crumbling infrastructure. and local businesses can get back to work. we need that urgency of now to reconfigure our security policy. make sensible cuts and fashion a force that prepares us for conflicts of the future and not the past. we need the urgency of now to make sensible changes to social security and medicare to ensure the vitality of these programs for generations to come. batered -- it will reward us with a more sensible energy policy, good roads, and a sustainable social welfare system. we will be rewarded with the stable economy and reduced market volatility. we cannot wait to act. we are borrowing 42 cents for every dollar we spend. we have to take sensible steps to begin reducing our debt without stepping on a fragile economic recovery. rehave to take steps that are big, bold, and bipartisan. that's why i signed on to the cooper-latourette bipartisan budget agreement that would have saved $4 thrill over
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)